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Fines In Singapore: The Cost Of Breaking Everyday Rules

The worst way to lose money is probably through fines. Be it a careless mistake or a reckless moment, there is zero possibility of getting your money back.

To protect your pockets from silly mistakes, here are the most common everyday fines in Singapore you need to be aware of:

Public Transport

no eating on public transport

MRT Train- $500

Many sagas of eating on trains have made it onto the Straits Times the past couple of years. If a lady who ate a sweet to relieve her motion sickness could get fined $30, we know not to mess around.

Getting caught eating or drinking on the train will get you up to a $500 fine.

Don’t poke that straw into your Koi.

 

Bus – $0

Congratulations, it’s not illegal to eat on the bus!

But we know in our hearts that people will still stare us down if we do.

 

Daily Habits

no smoking

 

Smoking – $200

All of us are aware that smoking is no doubt expensive in Singapore. Previously, we even did a breakdown:

Estimated price of one pack of Cigarettes: Nexus = $10, Lucky Strike = $11, Marlboro = $10

Amount spent in 1 week = 2 packs x $12.50 (average price) = $25

Amount spent in 1 month = $100

The amount you can save in 1 year = $1200 

Adding on to that, smoking in prohibited places can land you in a fine of $200, or up to $1000 if convicted in court.

Places that prohibit smoking include:

  • Retail Places – Shopping Malls, Markets
  • Food Places – Restaurants, Food courts etc.
  • Sports and Recreational Facilities – Playgrounds, Sports Stadiums, Swimming Pools etc.
  • Healthcare Facilities – Hospitals, Clinics
  • Parks – Botanic Gardens, Tampines Eco Green, HortPark, Nature Reserves etc.
  • Schools and Libraries – Public libraries and any educational institutions
  • Common Areas – Stairwells, Lifts and Lift Lobbies, Void decks, Washrooms, Pedestrian Overhead Bridges etc.

This list goes on and more here information can be found on the ecitizen website.

 

Littering – $300

Singapore prides itself ourselves as a Clean and Green City and it surely does not tolerate littered pavements and streets.

First-time offenders can be fined up to $300, including Corrective Work Order (CWO) to pick or sweep up litter to reflect on how litter can mar our living environment.

Afterall, nothing works better than public shaming.

 

Vandalism – $2000

It’s not art.

A person who commits any act of vandalism attempts to do any such act or causes any such act to be done will be fined up to $2000 and be imprisonment for up to 3 years, including 3 to 8 strokes of the cane if it is not a first-time conviction.

Vandalism includes drawing, writing, marking or inscribing with pencil, crayon, chalk and other substances that are indelible.

If American Teenager Michael Fay’s saga didn’t express well enough this is illegal, I don’t know what else did.

 

Jay Walking – $20

First-time offenders will be fined $20 and repeated offenders will be fined up to $1000 with a 3-months jail term. Even though jaywalking often goes unpoliced, one mistake can cost the life of the pedestrian and the vehicle driver too.  

 

Motorised Scooters – $300 to $500

Any power-assisted bicycle or scooter is only allowed to travel at the maximum device speed of 25km/h and it also illegal to ride on roads. First-time offenders will face a fine of $300 to $500 and $2000 if you ride on expressways.

 

Overhead bridge cycling $20

Fines can range from $20 for riding on the pavement to as much as $5,000 if the cyclist is convicted of rash riding on a public way.

 

Traffic

Running Red Light – $200

Running the red light is greatly penalised in Singapore, costing you $200.00 and 12 demerit points. Stop when the light turns amber!

Your licence will be suspended should you accumulate more than 24 demerit points within 2 years.

 

Speeding – $130 to $200

Speeding, depending on the various speed limits will cost you from $130 to $200 and up to 24 demerit points deducted. Watch out for the speed cameras and drive safely!

 

Not Giving Way – $130

Failing to give way to ambulances, police vehicles, the fire brigade or oncoming traffic at junctions and roundabouts can all land you in a $130 fine and a deduction of 4 demerit points. 

Use of mobile phone while driving -$1000

A first-time offender will be fined up to $1000 and jailed for up to six months. Using your mobile device when the vehicle is stationary, for example at the traffic light is not adviced but also not an offence.

 

You can make your traffic fine payments at OnePay here: https://onepay.onemotoring.com.sg/onepay/index.do

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